Give positive feedback!

Providing feedback is a tricky thing.

Negative feedback almost always puts the other person into the frame of mind where learning is not possible – their sympathetic nervous system (fight-flight) is triggered, they go into the red brain - and their whole being focuses on that, not on learning.

To stimulate learning we need to give positive feedback and, as we know that more learning takes place when we focus on our strengths, then providing feedback around what is going well makes sense.

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John Corrigan
Comfortable or uncomfortable?

Neuroplasticity implies that we perform and grow best in our comfort zone, in the areas where we have thick groupings of neurons and dense synaptic connections.  The thought that learning takes place at the ‘edge’ of our comfort zones accommodates this sense that we are growing our strengths and greatest abilities.  We can call this type of growth horizontal, a thickening or intensification of what we already have.

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John Corrigan
Work your strengths!

Our brains are plastic meaning that we can continue to grow new neurons and make new synaptic connections all our lives.  This is neuroplasticity.

We grow neurons and connections most easily in the areas where neurons and their connections are most dense.As one neuroscientist put it, it is more like growing new buds on a branch than growing new branches.

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John Corrigan
Don't get angry!

Recently I saw a toddler fall over then look to its father before responding, the father laughed and said, “that was funny”. The toddler smiled and got up. Equally, the father might have looked concerned and the child might have cried feeling it was hurt. In either case the child was learning its response to its internal feelings from the key adults around it.

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John Corrigan